Take your clinic to cosmic realms with Pantone Ultra Violet!

Take your clinic to cosmic realms with Pantone Ultra Violet!

We’re taking a stand: If your veterinary hospital isn’t bathed in the 2018 Pantone Color of the Year, you’re doing it WRONG.
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Mar 30, 2018
By dvm360.com staff

Disclaimer: Quotes used in article may have been tweaked to fit our agenda. (Shutterstock.com)Anyone keeping their finger on the pulse of what’s hot in veterinary hospital decor and design is, of course, familiar with the Pantone Color of the Year. If you don't know what we’re talking about, here’s the lowdown (and a verbal slap on the wrist):

What's Pantone? According to it's own website, the company is “the world-renowned authority on color and provider of color systems and leading technology for the selection and accurate communication of color across a variety of industries.” Every year, the organization's Color Institute picks a color of the year, which the website humbly describes as “one moment in time that provides strategic direction for the world of trend and design.” So, according to Pantone’s pick for 2018’s Color of the Year, the world of trend and design is moving in a PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet direction.

Your move, veterinary hospital design trendsetters.

Pantone’s 2018 Color of the Year is the answer to every color question in your hospital. What color should you paint the walls? Ultra Violet. What color tile should you use for the floors? Ultra Violet. What should you name your firstborn? Ultra Violet. What kind of lightbulbs should you use? Why, Ultra Violet, of course!

Not convinced? Good, because we’re kidding. Happy April Fools’ Day!

But, if you really love Ultra Violet, there are ways you can incorporate it into your hospital.

“Any color can be used well, but this one needs to be used in small quantities,” says veterinary architect and HospitalDesign360 speaker Heather Lewis, AIA, NCARB, of Animal Arts in Boulder, Colorado. For small doses of Pantone Ultra Violet, Lewis suggests buying pillows, furniture or artwork incorporating the color. She’s also had a client paint her clinic’s door frames purple. Moderation is key.

If Lewis could choose her own color of the year for veterinary hospitals, it would be blue. Studies have shown that dogs can see blue, so considering it’s also well-loved by humans, it seems like a win-win choice. (Check out how the color spectrum looks to dogs vs. people here.)

If you have any clever ideas for injecting small splashes of bold colors into your veterinary hospital, we’d love to hear about them (and see them)! Email us at [email protected].