Small-animal practices | Hospital Design

Small-animal practices

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2001
The only board-certified veterinary dentist in south Florida, Dr. Jan Bellows created a professional showcase to manage a flow of dental referrals and his general-practice clients in comfort.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2001
When Dr. Marcel Florax set out to find a new practice site, he knew that not just any property would do. He wanted the flavor of his hospital to shine through. A 3,500-square-foot barn from the mid-1800s ended up being the perfect home for his 150-year-old practice--one of the oldest in England.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2001
Converting a 7,200-square-foot shell into a high-tech surgical hospital required skill, patience, and compromise from the six owners of Veterinary Surgical Associates in Concord, Calif. The resulting clinic took home a Best Specialty Hospital Award--a new category in the Veterinary Economics 2001 Hospital Design Competition.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Apr 01, 2001
Studying Norwalk Veterinary Medical Center in Norwalk, Ohio, from a distance is like watching clouds on a summer day. Some people see a barn; others see a train depot. And everyone is right. "We wanted to build a charming facility, inspired by old barns and train depots, that evoked the veterinary profession's farm roots," owner Dr. Ronald G. Hendrikson says. This vision led him to create an award-winning floor plan in just 2,736 square feet.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2001
Judging by the design of this year's best veterinary hospital, "form follows function" may be the trend of the new millennium. Meadow Hills Veterinary Center in Kennewick, Wash., showcases a classic design based on this hospital's dual functions--a traditional small animal practice by day, an emergency clinic by night. With its second-story atrium windows illuminating the hospital like a beacon, this 6,524-square-foot facility shines above the rest as the 2001 Hospital of the Year.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Feb 01, 2001
After 25 years of traveling to Garberville, Calif., to visit her family members, Dr. Judy Horvath and her husband, Steve Horvath, decided to simplify their lives and settle in the northern California village. Back in 1991, just two years after Dr. Horvath graduated from the University of California-Davis, the couple bought the only veterinary practice in the 1,200-person town.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 2001
The premise of the TV show "Ed" isn't original: lawyer Ed opens a professional practice in a bowling alley. Dr. Kovacic beat NBC to the punch in 1988 when he moved Animal Emergency Center in Milwaukee into a leased space in a bowling alley. Dr. Rebecca Kirby, Dipl. ACVIM, Dipl. ACVECC, once a partner and now sole shareholder, remembers the location fondly: "We couldn't tell if it was thundering or someone made a strike," she says.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Dec 01, 2000
If you think constant barking is maddening, add the steady pounding of jackhammers. Then work under those conditions for a year. Partners Drs. Scott Griffin, Ann Allen Salter, and Bill VanHooser sacrificed quiet to add 6,613 square feet to their 7,295-square-foot Carriage Hills Animal Hospital and Pet Resort in Montgomery, Ala.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 2000
There's strength in numbers, the saying goes. But for the veterinarians at Findlay Animal Hospital in Findlay, Ohio, strength comes not only from the number of doctors but also from the number of hospitals they own around town.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 2000
Looking at the 18,832-square-foot Veterinary Referral Center of Colorado in Englewood, Colo., it's hard to imagine the practice's humble beginnings. In 1991, Dr. Sam Romano's emergency practice merged with Dr. Steve Wheeler's internal medicine practice and Dr. Marlon Neely's mobile surgical practice in an 1,100-square-foot garage. Three years later they added oncologist Dr. Robyn Elmslie, Dipl. ACVIM, and moved into a 5,600-square-foot converted dental facility.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
Good luck and support from her family made all the difference when Dr. Sue A. Stiff was building a new facility for Kiln Creek Animal Care in Newport News, Va. Most business owners in this seaside locale can't afford land. But fortune smiled when Dr. Stiff secured a 2.7-acre site in an exclusive golf community--for half its value. In addition, her husband, a local emergency veterinarian, kept an eye on the practice while she devoted her time to the building project.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2000
Consulting with clients over a picnic table, housing patients in the restroom, and stacking portable cages to the ceiling may sound like a bad dream to most veterinarians. Dr. Neil Shaw and his team endured this daily reality for more than two years at Florida Veterinary Specialists, a 1,500-square-foot leasehold hospital in Tampa, Fla.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2000
How often does a knock on the door make your dream come true? Once was enough for Drs. James McGill and Linda Miller, two veterinarians who worked in separate practices north of Seattle. Despite a virtually invisible location, Dr. McGill's 2,300-square-foot leasehold was growing 30 percent each year. And Dr. Miller wanted to offer 24-hour care, but a surgical hospital rented the facility during the day. Both doctors wanted new hospitals, but the cost held them back.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 2000
When you mention Colorado, most people picture spectacular views. But from their tiny strip-mall leasehold, staff members at Centennial Valley Animal Hospital in Louisville, Colo., could barely see the parking lot, much less the Rocky Mountains beyond.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Apr 01, 2000
Drivers passing East Lake Veterinary Hospital in Dallas do a doubletake when they see dogs running across the roof of the facility. To offer obedience training in her new practice, owner Dr. Karen Ann Fling added a 2,500-square-foot roof deck. This amenity garners plenty of attention, especially when training classes are in full swing.