Planning guide | Hospital Design

Planning guide

source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2000
When one McDonald's restaurant faced a space dilemma, the owner tore down a wall--and made the building smaller. This may seem like the wrong approach, but the squeeze forced employees to examine traffic flow and suggest improvements. With less space to work, the owner knew everyone would become more efficient.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2000
Q. When designing my practice, should I create separate entrances for grooming, boarding, and retail areas or have all clients enter through the main door?
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Designing an animal hospital means compromising between the practical and prophetic. It's easy to criticize early floor plans or older hospitals. But how could these architects have foreseen future treatment and service options? Veterinary hospitals are built to serve medical technology, and technology constantly evolves.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Q. I plan to build a new hospital, but I worry about devoting adequate time to the project without neglecting my practice. Does a building project affect revenue, and how can I best handle this time commitment?
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Q. I plan to build a new hospital, but I worry about devoting adequate time to the project without neglecting my practice. Does a building project affect revenue, and how can I best handle this time commitment?
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
At age 10, my friends and I thought we'd be driving flying cars by 2000. We never envisioned laptop computers, the Internet, or virtual reality. Now the flying car seems absurd, and computers are commonplace. There's a lesson here: When predicting the future, practicality always wins.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 1999
Q. I'm preparing to sign my first building lease but worry I might miss important details. What should I know before committing?
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 1998
When selecting your veterinary hospital's site, a high-traffic road may not be your best option, says Larry Gates, a senior principal with Gates Hafen Cochrane Architects P.C. in Boulder, Colo. During the 1998 Veterinary Economics Hospital Design Conference in Kansas City, Mo., he showed attendees how to target a market niche and noted that while conventional wisdom suggests busy streets provide the best visibility, clients who can't easily reach your hospital will probably go elsewhere.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1998
Blame fate for Dr. Robert C. Brown, director of Cherrydale Veterinary Clinic in Arlington, Va., bumping into architect and analyst E. John Knapp, AIA, from Oregon, Wis., at a national conference. Dr. Brown wanted to renovate his hospital to improve traffic flow.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 1998
Have you ever based an important decision on one person's opinion? Imagine not selling pet food because one client prefers buying it from a superstore. You won't benefit from retail sales--or any service--until you ask many clients. Consider a client survey before expanding or building a new facility. If you own a practice, give the survey to clients on arrival. If you're starting a practice from scratch, consider a mail or phone survey. Include these topics:
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 1998
Buying or starting a practice can be one of the most overwhelming moves of your veterinary career. But you don't have to experience it alone. These resources can help you create research that guarantees your new hospital's success.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 1998
Buying or starting a practice can be one of the most overwhelming moves of your veterinary career. But you don't have to experience it alone. These resources can help you create research that guarantees your new hospital's success.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Apr 01, 1998
By dvm360.com staff
Many associates dream of a fixer-upper they can buy for nothing down and low payments, then turn it into a $1 million practice overnight. I hear an occasional success story, but most new owners experience something different.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 1998
Are you--and clients--getting bored staring at the same four walls every day? Maybe it's time to give your hospital a new look. If you're not ready to build a new facility, consider an inexpensive design innovation. You'll make your practice a fun, new place again. Choose from such simple projects as a canine agility course or kids' play area to breathe new life into your hospital.
source-image
HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 1996
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) made discrimination based on physical disability illegal. The law was originally designed to eliminate employment discrimination, but it applies to public access as well. Any new facility, addition, or significant remodel built after Jan. 26, 1992, must conform to the ADA. The act specifies that second-floor offices, apartments, and conference rooms be accessible as well. While the following isn't an exhaustive list of ADA requirements, it does offer common compliance guidelines that can help prevent a lawsuit.