Materials | Hospital Design

Materials

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2001
Buying the right radiograph machine takes research. Dr. David S. Biller, Dipl. ACVR, a radiology professor at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan., suggests you consider these factors when choosing a unit:
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Feb 01, 2001
You'd probably like to own an ultrasound machine, but before spending your hard-earned money, take time to determine whether you really need and will use one. "Ultrasound is to soft tissues what radiographs are to the bone, and we certainly see more soft tissue injuries than we do bone injuries," says Dr. Tracy Turner, Professor of Large Animal Surgery at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul, Minn. "You can't live without an ultrasound machine if you do lots of reproduction and lameness work. And it's also useful for visualizing the heart, lungs, pleural cavity, intestines, and other internal organs."
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 2001
Q. My old exam rooms contain tile floors and rubber baseboards. Waxing maintains the tile, but the baseboards attract dirt and cat hair, and the seam between the floor and boards gets very grimy. What can I do?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
When people shop for used cars, they kick the tires and check under the hood. When they shop for veterinary services, the evaluation is more subtle. But in both cases, they form lasting opinions based on first impressions. That's why it's critical to minimize noise and odor. Simply put, if your clinic stinks, clients may worry that your medical care stinks, too.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2000
Your new computer is humming on your desk. So what do you do with the old one collecting dust in the corner?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2000
Q. I'm shopping for a new radiograph machine. Which offers greater tax advantages, buying or leasing?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2000
Whether you're building a new facility or updating your hospital, don't overlook wall finishes. Wayne Usiak, AIA, a Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member and principal of BDA Architecture PC in Albuquerque, N.M., suggests you consider these options for your practice:
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2000
You know the benefits of offering a complete in-house lab. You--and anxious pet owners--can get quick answers on complex cases, and you can begin treatment immediately rather than hospitalizing the patient until you receive test results the next morning. In addition, owning high-tech gadgets lets you practice high-quality medicine.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 1999
Q. In a residential neighborhood or commercial leasehold, how can I design my facility so barking dogs don't disturb neighbors?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 1999
You've spent a year researching the benefits of laser surgery, and you think this new service will enhance your practice's surgical options. You've even selected the unit and considered financing options. But have you done all your homework? Before you buy expensive equipment, take time to calculate the financial benefits--and hidden costs.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 1999
When you dream about new equipment, also consider replacing existing units that no longer meet your needs. As you compose your wish list, ask these questions to determine whether an item is still efficient:
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 1999
Q. In my practice's kennel and grooming areas, staff members can encounter noise levels OSHA calls damaging. To keep noise from invading other areas, I've contained it in these sections. Short of a major redesign, how can I reduce exposure?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 1997
The World Health Organization estimates that 30 percent of buildings exhibit sick-building syndrome. How can you tell if your hospital suffers from SBS? Your staff may complain of headaches; eye, nose, or throat irritation; itchy skin; dizziness and nausea; difficulty concentrating; fatigue; or sensitivity to odors--symptoms that disappear once a person leaves the hospital. Although such symptoms may indicate another illness, studies show that indoor air pollution can exacerbate health problems.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 1996
By dvm360.com staff
Q. How does one calculate how much air movement is appropriate in a kennel? I'm concerned that several air exchanges per hour would pump large amounts of heat and air conditioning through the wall we so carefully sealed and insulated. A large window unit cools our kennel; should I allow it to vent at all times? Is an interior circulating fan required to move out stale air?