Location | Hospital Design

Location

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
Your choice to work in the beauty of the countryside or on the teeming street corner in view of all passersby may influence your state of mind—but it also affects your pay. The Brakke Management and Behavior Study, released in 1999, shows that practitioners who choose to live in rural settings generally earn less than their urban counterparts. For example, practice owners who work in communities of 2,500 people or fewer earn 21 percent less than owners who live in larger communities.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2002
Dr. Troy Bearden likens building a new hospital to walking a tightrope without a net. "You take a chance and hope you don’t fall," he says. For him and his partner, Dr. Catherine Mabe, the risk paid off. Their 5,300-square-foot Shallowford Animal Hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn., more than doubles the size of their former facility and won a Merit Award in the 2002 Veterinary Economics Hospital Design Competition. Two years after opening, the doctors still see new-client numbers increase 30 percent a month.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2002
Architect hands down hard lessons in building veterinary practices from the ground up
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 2002
Q. I’ve worked as an associate at an equine clinic for several years. Now I’m ready to start my own mobile practice, but I signed a noncompete agreement with the clinic I currently work for. Can I still practice in this area, or do I need to move to another location? What other legal issues do I need to consider?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Dec 01, 2001
Dr. Richard Piepgras started working at Lakeland Veterinary Hospital his senior year of high school. During the summer visit to his family’s vacation cabin, he worked in the kennel, mowed the lawn, and even assisted in surgery. "I’ve been here a long time," says the 1967 Iowa State graduate, chuckling. Little did he know that he would someday own the practice—and build an award-winning facility to house it.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 2001
By dvm360.com staff
If you're thinking of relocating your hospital, your current clients can "point" you in the right direction. Post an area map on corkboard in your reception area and invite clients to mark their neighborhood with a pushpin, says Dr. Sue Summers, an associate in Midwest City, Okla.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 2001
Q. I've owned a small animal practice in a suburb for nearly a year, and business is fair. There's one big problem, though: No one can find my practice. It's not on a main thoroughfare or a corner lot, so we don't attract many new clients--if any--from drive-by traffic. Even my established clients complain the hospital's too far off the beaten path. Are we sunk in this location? Is there anything we can do to try and make it work?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2001
When Dr. Marcel Florax set out to find a new practice site, he knew that not just any property would do. He wanted the flavor of his hospital to shine through. A 3,500-square-foot barn from the mid-1800s ended up being the perfect home for his 150-year-old practice--one of the oldest in England.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Feb 01, 2001
After 25 years of traveling to Garberville, Calif., to visit her family members, Dr. Judy Horvath and her husband, Steve Horvath, decided to simplify their lives and settle in the northern California village. Back in 1991, just two years after Dr. Horvath graduated from the University of California-Davis, the couple bought the only veterinary practice in the 1,200-person town.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jan 01, 2001
The premise of the TV show "Ed" isn't original: lawyer Ed opens a professional practice in a bowling alley. Dr. Kovacic beat NBC to the punch in 1988 when he moved Animal Emergency Center in Milwaukee into a leased space in a bowling alley. Dr. Rebecca Kirby, Dipl. ACVIM, Dipl. ACVECC, once a partner and now sole shareholder, remembers the location fondly: "We couldn't tell if it was thundering or someone made a strike," she says.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Dec 01, 2000
Q. After 23 years in the same location, my veterinary practice is landlocked. Parking space is almost nonexistent, and traffic is so heavy clients sometimes struggle to even enter the lot. My wife suggested we move into an area where housing is booming. But our practice is still growing where we are, and I don't want to move too far from this location. In a city with 80,000 people and nine other clinics, how far can I move without losing my client base?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Nov 01, 2000
Dr. Timothy J. Thompson wanted to own a practice so much, he says he would've bought a lemonade stand with a dog run attached. So he and his wife, Dr. Shannon A. Thompson, both 1994 Texas A&M University graduates, only spent a year as associates before buying Hope Animal Clinic in Marble Falls, Texas. They leased the 850-square-foot building and within a year bought land to build the mixed animal facility of their dreams.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 2000
There's strength in numbers, the saying goes. But for the veterinarians at Findlay Animal Hospital in Findlay, Ohio, strength comes not only from the number of doctors but also from the number of hospitals they own around town.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 2000
Looking at the 18,832-square-foot Veterinary Referral Center of Colorado in Englewood, Colo., it's hard to imagine the practice's humble beginnings. In 1991, Dr. Sam Romano's emergency practice merged with Dr. Steve Wheeler's internal medicine practice and Dr. Marlon Neely's mobile surgical practice in an 1,100-square-foot garage. Three years later they added oncologist Dr. Robyn Elmslie, Dipl. ACVIM, and moved into a 5,600-square-foot converted dental facility.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
Good luck and support from her family made all the difference when Dr. Sue A. Stiff was building a new facility for Kiln Creek Animal Care in Newport News, Va. Most business owners in this seaside locale can't afford land. But fortune smiled when Dr. Stiff secured a 2.7-acre site in an exclusive golf community--for half its value. In addition, her husband, a local emergency veterinarian, kept an eye on the practice while she devoted her time to the building project.