First steps | Hospital Design

First steps

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Taking the next big step in practice? Whether you're adding a doctor to the team, making the jump to partner, or taking on a remodeling or building project, we've got the right advice.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 05, 2005
These doctors learned the hard way what they should have done during the construction of their hospitals. Now that they're enjoying their award-winning facilities, they're ready to share their stories—and help you avoid the same problems.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Learn how to build a winning hospital from start to finish with this advice from Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board members and Hospital Design Competition winners.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2005
Don't waste your energy trying to squeeze a 15,000-square-foot hospital onto a 3,000-square-foot lot. Instead, exercise flexible thinking, creative planning, and strategic cost controls to build your dream.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2004
All doctors who plan to build hear from colleagues who've been there before that they should build bigger than they think they need to. Drs. Kate Knutson and Steve Barghusen took those words to heart--working in an extra 3,700 square feet for future expansion.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2004
Choosing your architect is one of the most important things you'll do when building or remodeling your practice. Your architect sets the pace for the project--and you'll have enough stress without suffering from communication problems with this key player. Here's what to do.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Oct 01, 2001
By dvm360.com staff
I know I must meet Occupational Safety and Health Agency (OSHA) requirements when building my new veterinary practice, but how much will these standards affect my design plans?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2001
Q. I'm considering building my own clinic. What should I ask when hiring an architect? A. Hiring the right architect is one of the most important decisions you'll make during the building process, say Sal Longo Jr. and Michael Crosby, co-owners of Crosby Longo Architecture studio in New Orleans, La., and designers of the 2000 Hospital of the Year.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
If you come to work every day, park in back, and hurry in the staff entrance, you may be missing out on the little things that detract from clients' impressions of your facility. To identify areas where your practice falls short, look at your hospital the way pet owners do. Here's a guide:
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
You're finally ready to build your dream hospital or expand your existing facility. For years, you've read design articles in Veterinary Economics and carefully studied every floor plan. You've also planned to hire an award-winning veterinary architect. But one of your clients is an architect, and you like her work.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Designing an animal hospital means compromising between the practical and prophetic. It's easy to criticize early floor plans or older hospitals. But how could these architects have foreseen future treatment and service options? Veterinary hospitals are built to serve medical technology, and technology constantly evolves.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Q. I plan to build a new hospital, but I worry about devoting adequate time to the project without neglecting my practice. Does a building project affect revenue, and how can I best handle this time commitment?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
Q. I plan to build a new hospital, but I worry about devoting adequate time to the project without neglecting my practice. Does a building project affect revenue, and how can I best handle this time commitment?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1998
Blame fate for Dr. Robert C. Brown, director of Cherrydale Veterinary Clinic in Arlington, Va., bumping into architect and analyst E. John Knapp, AIA, from Oregon, Wis., at a national conference. Dr. Brown wanted to renovate his hospital to improve traffic flow.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 1998
Have you ever based an important decision on one person's opinion? Imagine not selling pet food because one client prefers buying it from a superstore. You won't benefit from retail sales--or any service--until you ask many clients. Consider a client survey before expanding or building a new facility. If you own a practice, give the survey to clients on arrival. If you're starting a practice from scratch, consider a mail or phone survey. Include these topics: