Facility Design | Hospital Design

Facility Design

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2004
All doctors who plan to build hear from colleagues who've been there before that they should build bigger than they think they need to. Drs. Kate Knutson and Steve Barghusen took those words to heart--working in an extra 3,700 square feet for future expansion.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 2003
By dvm360.com staff
Not every profit center suits every practice. How do you decide what to add? Follow these steps from Practice Management Editor Mark Opperman, CVPM, president of VMC Inc. in Evergreen Colo., and Indianapolis.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 2003
By dvm360.com staff
The Center for Specialized Veterinary Care, a new hospital in Long Island, N.Y., is the first to offer pet owners private rooms so they can stay with their hospitalized pets 24 hours a day.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Apr 01, 2003
Soon-to-be-moms, nursing moms, and toddlers are a part of practice now more than ever. And as an ever-increasing number of female veterinarians seek employment, and eventually ownership, women’s needs will influence facility design even more.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2003
Five years ago Dr. Neil Shaw and his 14 associates worked from a 1,500-square-foot facility. They had so little exam space they were forced to consult with clients over a picnic table or across the seat of a client’s car. Dr. Shaw knew he needed more room, so he built an 11,575-square-foot facility to house 75 staff members in 1999—a facility that won a 2000 Merit Award from Veterinary Economics.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 2002
Twenty-four percent of Well-Managed Practices offer separate canine and feline seating areas. How separate do the areas need to be to make the distinction effective, and how could you add this feature to a facility economically?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2000
Do veterinarians and staff members constantly trip over each other's feet at your practice? Or maybe you round corners with caution to avoid taking out unsuspecting clients. Even remodeling or expanding your facility may not fix the problem if you don't develop an efficient floor plan.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2000
Q. When designing my practice, should I create separate entrances for grooming, boarding, and retail areas or have all clients enter through the main door?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 1999
At age 10, my friends and I thought we'd be driving flying cars by 2000. We never envisioned laptop computers, the Internet, or virtual reality. Now the flying car seems absurd, and computers are commonplace. There's a lesson here: When predicting the future, practicality always wins.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 1996
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) made discrimination based on physical disability illegal. The law was originally designed to eliminate employment discrimination, but it applies to public access as well. Any new facility, addition, or significant remodel built after Jan. 26, 1992, must conform to the ADA. The act specifies that second-floor offices, apartments, and conference rooms be accessible as well. While the following isn't an exhaustive list of ADA requirements, it does offer common compliance guidelines that can help prevent a lawsuit.